The Art of Protecting Points – Oley Kiatoneway

In Thailand, if a fighter gains a significant points advantage during a fight, you’ll often see them “protecting points”.

By this, I mean that the fighter will begin to solidify their performance by using their defensive manoeuvres and evasive techniques to avoid taking any unnecessary damage and see the fight out, knowing that they have the win in the bag. Protecting points is rather like “parking the bus” in football (soccer) whereby a team will shut up shop once they have the lead and will defend heavily to stop the other team from scoring except maybe for the odd counter-attack.

Protecting points is rather like “parking the bus” in football (soccer) whereby a team will shut up shop once they have the lead and will defend heavily to stop the other team from scoring except maybe for the odd counter-attack.

In this particular fight, Oley Kiatoneway knocks his opponent down in round 2 and immediately begins to protect his points. He uses some incredibly quick evasive change-of-direction manoeuvres to stuff Chamuekpet’s relentless pressure and basically leads him on a wild goose chase for the next three rounds.

This isn’t too dissimilar to the way Oley would normally fight as he was a great technician and extremely elusive, but here he pretty much fights by moving backwards for three or four rounds.

Many fighters enter this fighting mode when they are confident of seeing the final rounds out without getting unscathed, but only the best technicians are able to do this for an extended period against a fighter who simultaneously held five Rajadamnern titles and four Lumpinee titles in Chamuekpet Hapalang. Incredible.

About Aaron Jahn

Aaron is an active muay Thai fighter and coach from the UK. He holds a BSc (hons) degree in Strength & Conditioning and is currently studying a Sports Therapy Master's degree in Leeds, UK. Aaron has fought over 20 times in Thailand and has spent years training at different muay Thai camps all over the country.

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